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1574. (Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum

  • (Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum
  • (Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum
  • (Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum
  • (Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum

(Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 4839x3236 px
Disk Size: 
 3.44192MiB
Number of pages: 
 28
Place: 
 Antwerp
Author: 

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  67.21 х 44.94
Printing at 150 dpi 
 32.26 х 21.57
Printing at 300 dpi 
 16.13 х 10.79

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(Atlas) Theatrum Orbis Terrarum [with] Addiamentum

1574 Theatrum Orbis Terrarum with 1584 Addiamentum and Several Extra Maps!

Theatrum: [A6], [B4]; 70 double-page engraved maps; [a-h6]. Complete. The name Andreas Donelli appears on the title page of the Theatrum. This is likely a member of the Donelli family of Bologna, a noble family dating the 15th Century.

Folio. Expertly rebound utilizing later Dutch gilt vellum, the covers with thin panels at the edges, the central panel with gilt-tooled arabesques in the corners and the central figure of Atlas carrying an armillary; the spine and covers remboitaged from different bindings.

Addiamentum: Title and contents leaf, 29 double-page engraved map sheets (with the large Egypt on two sheets), including 2 extra maps from a Dutch edition of the atlas.

Folio. Remboitage full vellum, recased; blue cloth ties.

Maps of 1584

Here, the 1574 edition of the atlas is supplemented with the additional maps published up to 1584 in the Additamentum. Most notably, this is the first appearance of the map of China (the first modern map of China) and the map of Florida (the first map to focus on this region).

Theatrum Orbis Terrarum

Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (or "Theater of the World") is widely considered to be the first true modern atlas. The Theatrum was the best available summary of 16th-century cartographic knowledge, covering much of the exploration of the world in the century following the discovery of America.

The atlas was first published in 1570 in Antwerp, and it was published consistently until 1612. Recent research has unearthed examples of the atlas with maps dated to 1640.

Ortelius was the artist of all of the maps; he drew them by hand, and those drawings were interpreted into prints by his engravers Frans Hogenberg, Ambrosius Arsenius, and Ferdinand Arsenius.

The broad appeal of the Theatrum saw demand from many consumers who preferred to read the atlas in their local language. Thus, in addition to Latin, the book was published with text in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and English.

After Ortelius's death in 1598, the copper plates for his atlas passed to his heirs. They, in turn, sold the collection to Jan Baptist Vrients (1522-1612) in 1601. Vrients added new maps and published the atlas until his death in 1612. Vrients's widow then sold the plates to the Moretus brothers, who were the successors of Christoffel Plantin.

Theatrum Orbis Terrarum

Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (or "Theater of the World") is widely considered to be the first modern atlas, meaning that this was the first published set of uniform maps with supporting text gathered in book form. Previous bound map collections exist, for example the Italian Lafreri atlases, but these were sets of maps selected and bound together on demand. The Theatrum, in contrast, was the best available summary of sixteenth-century cartographic knowledge, covering much of the exploration of the world in the century following the discovery of America.

The atlas was first published in 1570 Antwerp. Ortelius’ atlas outperformed later competing atlases from other cartographic luminaries like the De Jode and the Mercator family. The broad appeal of the work is demonstrated by the array of languages in which the atlas appeared: in addition to Latin, the atlas was published with text in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and English. Between 1570 and 1612, at least 31 editions of the atlas were published in seven languages. The editions grew over time, with the first edition having had 53 maps, and the 1612 edition having 167.

At the time of its publication, the Theatrum was the most expensive book ever produced. Ortelius created all maps personally, hand drawing the rough sketches. Those drawings were then interpreted into prints by his engravers Frans Hogenberg, Ambrosius Arsenius, and Ferdinand Arsenius.

After Ortelius's death in 1598, the copper plates for his atlas passed to his heirs. They, in turn, sold the collection to Jan Baptist Vrients (1522-1612) in 1601. Vrients added new maps and published the atlas until his own death in 1612. Vrients's widow then sold the plates to the Moretus brothers, who were the successors of Christoffel Plantin. Recent research has unearthed examples of the atlas with maps dated to 1640.

Koeman 31:022

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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
4839x3236 px
Disk:
3.44192MiB
Number of pages:
28
Place:
Antwerp
Author:
Abraham Ortelius.
$24.99

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