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1584. Chinae, olim Sinarum regionis nova descriptio auctore Ludovico Georgio . . . 1584 [First State]

  • Chinae, olim Sinarum regionis nova descriptio auctore Ludovico Georgio . . . 1584  [First State]

Chinae, olim Sinarum regionis nova descriptio auctore Ludovico Georgio . . . 1584 [First State] information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 12400x10010 px
Disk Size: 
 44.9888MiB
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 Antwerp
Author: 

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  172.22 х 139.03
Printing at 150 dpi 
 82.67 х 66.73
Printing at 300 dpi 
 41.33 х 33.37

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Chinae, olim Sinarum regionis nova descriptio auctore Ludovico Georgio . . . 1584  [First State]

First State of Ortelius' Map of China

Old color example of the scarce first state of Ortelius' map of China, the first western map of China.

Ortelius' map of China is taken directly from reports of the Portuguese mapmaker Luis Jorge de Barbuda (Ludovicus Georgius), who made a manuscript map of China which reached Ortelius via Arias Montanus. First published in 1584, Ortelius' map of China is the earliest printed map to focus on China and the first to illustrate the Great Wall of China. Tooley referred to the map as the standard map of the interior of China for over sixty years. With its three lushly designed cartouches and many illustrations of indigenous shelters, modes of transportation and animals, this is one of Ortelius's richest engravings.

When this map appeared, it was by far the most accurate representation of China to appear on a printed map. Japan is shown on a curious curved projection reminiscent of Portuguese charts of the period with Honshu dissected along the line of Lake Biwa. The Great Wall is shown, but only a relatively small section, its length is significantly underestimated. The Tartar "yurts" are dotted across the plains and steppes of Central and East Asia.

The Portuguese Jesuits established a mission in China in 1577. Although the map's Portuguese maker, Barbuda, was himself not a Jesuit, his sources for the map were Portuguese Jesuits. The Chinese characters found in the text on the verso of the map were the first introduction to Chinese language for many educated Europeans of the time.

There are 3 states of the map:

  • State 1: Pre-dates the words "Las Philippinas" above Sinus Magnus
  • State 2: Las Philippinas added during the publication of the 1587 French edition (second state)
  • State 3: Additional cross hatching in one of the wind wagons, which first appeared on the map during the publication of the 1595 edition
Suarez (1999) "Early Mapping of South-East Asia", Periplus, p. 164-170, Figure 88. ; Van den Broecke, 164; Nebenzahl, K. Mapping the Silk Road and Beyond 4.6; Tooley, Maps and Mapmakers, p. 106, pl. 78 (p. 108); Walter, L. Japan: A Cartographic Vision 11F, p. 186.

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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
12400x10010 px
Disk:
44.9888MiB
Number of pages:
1
Place:
Antwerp
Author:
Abraham Ortelius.
$14.99

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