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1708. Haemisphaerii Borealis Coeli et Terrae Sphaeri Cascenographia

  • Haemisphaerii Borealis Coeli et Terrae Sphaeri Cascenographia

Haemisphaerii Borealis Coeli et Terrae Sphaeri Cascenographia information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 13067x11471 px
Disk Size: 
 57179600B
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 Amsterdam
Author: 

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  181.49 х 159.32
Printing at 150 dpi 
 87.11 х 76.47
Printing at 300 dpi 
 43.56 х 38.24

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Haemisphaerii Borealis Coeli et Terrae Sphaeri Cascenographia

Nice example of this finely executed map of the Northern Sky, illustrating the constellations of the Northern Hemisphere superimposed over the Pacific Ocean, first published by Andreas Cellarius in 1660.

The map provides a fantastic image of the stars, as if seen from deeper in space, so that each of the constellations is facing in the opposite direction from the way that the same constellations would be seen from earth. This projection reflects a theory which originated with Petrus Plancius that the stars remained in a sphere-like configuration above the earth, which moved in coordination with the earth. This theory is found in the title of his atlas, Harmonia Macrocosmica.

As noted by Kanas, the constellations are shown "in an external orientation between the north and south celestial poles . . . and the vernal equinox . . . .[based on] the work of Petrus Plancius.

The celestial hemisphere is surrounded by an allegorical scene showing the most modern devices for astronomical observations in the lower corners.

Andreas Cellarius was born in 1596 in Neuhausen and educated in Heidelberg. He emigrated to Holland in the early 17th Century and in1637 moved to Hoorn, where he became the rector of the Latin School. Cellarius' best known work is his Harmonia Macrocosmica, first issued in 1660 by Jan Jansson, as a supplement to Jansson's Atlas Novus. The work consists of a series of Celestial Charts begun by Cellarius in 1647 and intended as part of a two volume treatise on cosmography, which was never issued.

Cellarius' charts are the most sought after of celestial charts, blending the striking imagery of the golden age of Dutch Cartography with contemporary scientific knowledge. The present examples come from the Valk & Schenk edition of Cellarius' atlas, which is unchanged from the 1661 edition. The 1660 and 1661 editions can be distinguished by the inclusion of a plate number in the lower right corner of the 1661 edition. The Valk & Schenk edition can be distinguished by the addition of the printer's name (Valk & Schenk) in the titles of the maps.

Kanas, Star Maps: History, Artistry, and Cartography, p. 194

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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
13067x11471 px
Disk:
57179600B
Number of pages:
1
Place:
Amsterdam
Author:
Andreas Cellarius.
$14.99

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