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1619. Helvetia cum finitimis regionibus confoederatis

  • Helvetia cum finitimis regionibus confoederatis

Helvetia cum finitimis regionibus confoederatis information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 2089x1612 px
Disk Size: 
 1.1831MiB
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 Amsterdam
Author: 

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  29.01 х 22.39
Printing at 150 dpi 
 13.93 х 10.75
Printing at 300 dpi 
 6.96 х 5.37

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Helvetia cum finitimis regionibus confoederatis

Nice old color example of Gerhard Mercator's detailed map of Switzerland, from his Atlas Sive Comographie . . . , the first book of maps to include the title of "Atlas."

One of the earliest maps of Switzerland to appear in a modern atlas.

Gerard Mercator is one of the most famous cartographers of all time. Mercator was born in Flanders and educated at the Catholic University in Leuven. After his graduation in 1532, Mercator worked with Gemma Frisius, a prominent mathematician, and Gaspar a Myrica, a goldsmith and engraver. Together, these men produced globes and scientific instruments, allowing Mercator to hone his skills.

With his wife, Barbara, Mercator had six children: Arnold, Emerentia, Dorothes, Bartholomeus, Rumold, and Catharina.  In 1552, Mercator moved to Duisburg from Leuven, where he lived for the rest of his life. In 1564, he was appointed the official cosmographer to the court of Duke Wilhelm of Cleve.

Mercator’s most important contribution was the creation and popularization of a projection which now bears his name. On Mercator projection maps, all parallels and meridians are drawn at right angles to each other, with the distance between the parallels extending towards the poles. This allowed for accurate latitude and longitude calculation and also allowed navigational routes to be drawn using straight lines, a huge advantage for sailors as this allowed them to plot courses without constant recourse to adjusting compass readings.

Mercator’s other enduring contribution to cartography is the term “atlas”, which was first used to describe his collection of maps gathered in one volume. The Mercator atlas was published in 1595, a year after Mercator’s death, thanks to the work of his sons, particularly Rumold, and his grandsons.


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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
2089x1612 px
Disk:
1.1831MiB
Number of pages:
1
Place:
Amsterdam
Author:
Gerard Mercator.
$9.99

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