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1730. Hemisphaerium Coeli Boreale in quo Fixarum loca secundum Eclipticae ductum ad anum 1730 . . .

  • Hemisphaerium Coeli Boreale in quo Fixarum loca secundum Eclipticae ductum ad anum 1730 . . .

Hemisphaerium Coeli Boreale in quo Fixarum loca secundum Eclipticae ductum ad anum 1730 . . . information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 14972x12726 px
Disk Size: 
 62.9244MiB
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 Nuremberg

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  207.94 х 176.75
Printing at 150 dpi 
 99.81 х 84.84
Printing at 300 dpi 
 49.91 х 42.42

Doppelmayr's Chart of the Northern Celestial Hemisphere

A very fine 18th-century chart of the stars visible from the Northern Hemisphere, by the eminent astronomer Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr

This large and attractive chart depicts all of the celestial constellations visible from the Northern Hemisphere as observed by Doppelmayr in the year 1730. All of the various stars and constellations are labeled, while the full allegorical depictions appear in finely engraved detail, including all twelve of the zodiacal signs and other prominent formations such as Ursus Major, Pegasus and Hercules, amongst many others.

The corners of the composition are adorned by views of four of the greatest observatories of the modern era, including (from top left working clockwise): the Observatory of Tycho Brahe on the Island of Ven, Denmark, founded in 1576; the Paris Observatory founded 1667; the Nuremburg Observatory founded 1678 (where Doppelmayr made his observations); and, the Observatory of Johann Hevelius, founded in Gdansk, Poland in 1650. The tables on either side of the celestial circle describe the various constellations as depicted. This chart was one of the most important elements of Doppelmayr's great work, the Atlas Coelestis Novus, printed in Nuremburg by the Homann firm.

Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr (1677-1650) was born in Nuremburg and educated at the University of Halle. He returned to his native city where, from 1704 until his death, he served as professor of mathematics at the Aegidian Gymnasium. He acquired an international reputation and was elected as fellow of several scientific organizations, including the Royal Society of London, the Academiya Nauk in St. Petersburg and the Academia Caesarea Leopoldiana in Vienna.

Warner, 'The Sky Explored', no.1C, p.64.

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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
14972x12726 px
Disk:
62.9244MiB
Number of pages:
1
Place:
Nuremberg
Author:
Johann Gabriele Doppelmayr.
$14.99

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