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1728. (Iberian Peninula) . A Globular Chart Shewing the Errors of Plain, and the Deficiencyes of Mercators Sailing; and Discovering the true Navigation according to the Globe. Invented and Performed by John Harris, John Senex & Henry Wilson

  • (Iberian Peninula) . A Globular Chart Shewing the Errors of Plain, and the Deficiencyes of Mercators Sailing; and Discovering the true Navigation according to the Globe.  Invented and Performed by John Harris, John Senex & Henry Wilson

(Iberian Peninula) . A Globular Chart Shewing the Errors of Plain, and the Deficiencyes of Mercators Sailing; and Discovering the true Navigation according to the Globe. Invented and Performed by John Harris, John Senex & Henry Wilson information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 14844x12684 px
Disk Size: 
 27.5522MiB
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 London

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  206.17 х 176.17
Printing at 150 dpi 
 98.96 х 84.56
Printing at 300 dpi 
 49.48 х 42.28

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(Iberian Peninula) . A Globular Chart Shewing the Errors of Plain, and the Deficiencyes of Mercators Sailing; and Discovering the true Navigation according to the Globe.  Invented and Performed by John Harris, John Senex & Henry Wilson

Southern Sheet of Scarce Sea Chart Exhibiting a New Projection

Rare chart showing the Iberian Peninsula on a 'globular projection' (i.e. on the same projection as a double-hemisphere map). The charts consists of two sheets, and this is the southern-most sheet.

The chart was created by a brain trust made up of Harry Wilson, John Harris, and the renowned mapmaker and Fellow of the Royal Society John Senex. All three were mapmakers and map sellers. It purports to correct the errors of the Mercator chart, which was commonly thought as the best projection for navigation.

The chart includes testamentary statements from Sir Edmund Halley and Jonathan Merry, attesting to the accuracy and utility of the methodology employed on the chart for navigation. Halley's quote says:

I am of the opinion that this sort of Sea Charts shewing both the true Distances and Bearing of Places by the help of the Rumb lines drawn thereon may be of good use to Navigators; more especially to such as shall be desirous to sail by the Arch of a Great Circle.

John Merry, a captain, similarly states:

It is my Opinion that this Sea Chart shewing both the true Longitudes and Latitudes of Places, and also the true Bearings by the rumb lines drawn thereon, will be of good use in Navigation, particularly in Sailing by the Arch of a Great Circle.

On the northern sheet, the chart is dedicated "To the most Honourable The Lord Parker, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain &c." This is Thomas Parker, the 1st Earl of Macclesfield, Lord High Chancellor of Britain from 1718 to 1725. He was also a Fellow of the Royal Society and a pall bearer at Isaac Newton's funeral. However, in later life he was convicted of corruption and detained for most of his final years.

Atlas Maritimus et Commercialis

This charts was included in an important English maritime atlas of the early-eighteenth century, the Atlas Maritimus et Commercialis. The atlas included a geography text, sailing directions, and sea charts. It was published by, among others, the Knapton brothers, who were also responsible for some of the bestselling voyage accounts of the early- to mid-eighteenth century, including those of William Dampier.

The atlas was published specifically to rival the English Pilot, a five-volume work that was published first by John Seller, and then by his son, Jeremiah, and his partner, Charles Price, and then by Mount & Page. To differentiate it from the competition, the Atlas was published in one volume. It also featured the western and southern coasts of the Americas, which were not included in the Pilot.

Much of the text of the work is attributed to Daniel Defoe who, in addition to writing Robinson Crusoe, was also an eager advocate of colonial expansion and overseas trade. The atlas is usually attributed to John Senex, John Harris, and Henry Wilson. Nathaniel Cutler is thought to have contributed to the charts and to have written the sailing directions, which Edmund Halley supposedly edited. Edmund Halley is also mentioned on the title page as approving the projection, which most likely refers to a globular projection developed by Senex, Harris, and Wilson.

In 2015, a complete example of the atlas sold for £27,500 at Christie's in London. While the collaboration was impressive, the atlas never achieved the same commercial success. As such, the charts are quite scarce on the market.

McLaughlin, no.207; Shirley (BL Atlases) no.M.HALL-1a; Wagner, ‘Northwest’, no.532. KAP

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Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
14844x12684 px
Disk:
27.5522MiB
Number of pages:
1
Place:
London
Author:
John Senex. Edmund Halley. Nathaniel Cutler.
$14.99

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