logo

1690. Virginiae Partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumqus regionum Nova Descriptio

  • Virginiae Partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumqus regionum Nova Descriptio

Virginiae Partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumqus regionum Nova Descriptio information:

Year of creation: 
Resolution size (pixels): 
 14155x11444 px
Disk Size: 
 24.7744MiB
Number of pages: 
 1
Place: 
 Amsterdam
Author: 

Print information. Print size (Width x height in inches):
Printing at 72 dpi 
  196.6 х 158.94
Printing at 150 dpi 
 94.37 х 76.29
Printing at 300 dpi 
 47.18 х 38.15

An example of detailing the file of this map of in a printable high-resolution:

Click to open in high resolution (open in new tab).
Attention! this is just the central piece (central area 960x960 px) of the map file!
This is an example, so that you can see and study the level of detail of a given map. The entire Map will be fully available after payment!

Virginiae Partis australis, et Floridae partis orientalis, interjacentiumqus regionum Nova Descriptio

Nice example of this scarce late 17th Century map of the Southeast.

Valk & Schenk's map is a rare re-issue and reworking of Jan Jansson's map of the region.

Jansson's map of the Carolinas and Blaeu's map of the Carolinas are virtually indistinguishable cartographically, although there are a number of minor differences in the embellishments. Both maps are on the larger 1606 Mercator-Hondius map of the Carolinas but with significant improvements. The map covers an area from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay to Georgia and reflects the competing interests of France and England in the New World, with the coat of arms of each country identifying the regional control. As noted by Burden, the French claims are supported primarily by the French colonization efforts of the 1560s.

As noted by Burden,

The greatest improvement occurs in the northern half of the map north of Porto Royal. Whereas on the Hondius [map] the coastline towards C. de. Ste. Romano (present day Cape Fear) veered directly east, Blaeu more correctly takes it north-east, placing the cape closer to its true position of 34 degrees. This span of coastline is approximately that of present day South Carolina. This now presents to us a more accurately proportioned Outer Banks region, radically reduced in size but still slightly too far north. For these improvements, Blaeu drew upon the extremely rare DE EYLANDEN . . . by Hessel Gerritsz., c. 1631. The Outer Banks combine the placenames of Gerritsz and Hondius, often using two different ones for the same area . . . Chesapeake Bay was depicted just as a small bay on Hondius' map of 1606, as John Smith was yet to explore these waters. The Gerritsz terminated at this point, and only two placenames appeared. Blaeu draws largely on Smith's map for much of the nomenclature, but introduces some English [names] from an unknown source. The most important is Newport News. Newport News, founded in 1621 and apparently shown here for the first time on a printed map. Also new are Bermouth, Stortingen and Arglas . . .

Includes the marvelous mythical lakes in the interior and other conjectural cartography of the time.

Includes a large cartouche, 2 coats of arms, 2 compass roses and several sailing ships.

Burden 254. Cumming 42.

Special conditions for students!

If you are a student, write to us in telegram: @antiquemaps and indicate what material you need and for what work you need a map in high detail. We are ready to provide material on special terms. For students only!

Item information:

Year of creation:
Size:
14155x11444 px
Disk:
24.7744MiB
Number of pages:
1
Place:
Amsterdam
Author:
Peter Schenk. Gerard Valk.
$14.99

Related item